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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:27 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia

Untouchable. Shave yr head eternally. Untouchable.

_________________
Dynaco Sansui Marantz Line Magnetic Kyocera Oppo NAD Rotel Yamaha/Denon Denon/Grado Pioneer/Sumiko Sony/Nagaoka dbx 3BX III Large Advent Heritage Klipsch/Crites


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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:30 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
Seen. You are wasting away with nonsense news of the day nothingness. Seen.

_________________
Dynaco Sansui Marantz Line Magnetic Kyocera Oppo NAD Rotel Yamaha/Denon Denon/Grado Pioneer/Sumiko Sony/Nagaoka dbx 3BX III Large Advent Heritage Klipsch/Crites


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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:34 am 

Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 9:37 am
Posts: 824
Location: A grave in Ireland
“They are not that smart.”

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.


Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.


Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

_________________
This cosmic dance of bursting decadence and withheld permissions twists all our arms collectively, but if sweetness can win, and it can, then I'll still be here tomorrow to high five you yesterday. Peace!
http://www.facebook.com/PalaceInThunderland
http://palaceinthunderland.bandcamp.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:36 am 

Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 9:37 am
Posts: 824
Location: A grave in Ireland
libertycaps wrote:

Untouchable. Shave yr head eternally. Untouchable.




Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

_________________
This cosmic dance of bursting decadence and withheld permissions twists all our arms collectively, but if sweetness can win, and it can, then I'll still be here tomorrow to high five you yesterday. Peace!
http://www.facebook.com/PalaceInThunderland
http://palaceinthunderland.bandcamp.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:37 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
Dylan Thomas wrote:
libertycaps wrote:

Untouchable. Shave yr head eternally. Untouchable.




Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:37 am 

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Last edited by libertycaps on Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:37 am 

Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 9:37 am
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Location: A grave in Ireland
libertycaps wrote:
Dylan Thomas wrote:
libertycaps wrote:

Untouchable. Shave yr head eternally. Untouchable.




Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.




Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

Michelle Obama Confirms What You Suspected About the Rich and Powerful

“They are not that smart.”
Michelle Obama has been speaking a lot lately, between promoting her memoir and a slew of speaking engagements, from turning up on podcasts to being interviewed by Oprah. She may not always say things that her fans and supporters want to hear (like how she still claims to have no interest in running for office), but she often offers something worth chewing on.

In a Monday appearance in London, where she was interviewed onstage by the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the former First Lady addressed her own impostor syndrome and spoke of how it's often inseparable from her being a black woman in white, male-dominated spaces. "The size of our hips, our style, our swag, it becomes co-opted, but then we are demonized," she said, adding, "My advice to young women is that you have to start by getting those demons out of your head. The questions I ask myself—'Am I good enough?'—that haunts us, because the messages that are sent from the time we are little is: Maybe you are not, don't reach too high, don't talk too loud."

Related Video: George W. Bush Sneaks Candy To Michelle Obama

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENTAD
Subway Delivers
Obama's not just talking as someone who's become comfortable in positions of prestige and power—she's also talking as someone who's spent years around other people deeply enmeshed in and used to that power. And she's gained useful insight into dealing with world and business leaders.

"Here is the secret," she added. "I have been at probably every powerful table that you can think of, I have worked at nonprofits, I have been at foundations, I have worked in corporations, served on corporate boards, I have been at G-summits, I have sat in at the UN; they are not that smart."

One of the myths of "meritocracy" is that people gain money, power, and influence because they're inherently smarter or work harder than everyone else. There's been plenty of evidence that this isn't true, and now we have Michelle Obama to confirm it.

_________________
This cosmic dance of bursting decadence and withheld permissions twists all our arms collectively, but if sweetness can win, and it can, then I'll still be here tomorrow to high five you yesterday. Peace!
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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:41 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
You'd think an "artist" could be more creative here. Nope. You are a retarded bar pusher for sugar pills punk ass bitch. No wonder your music is soulless boring by-the-numbers shite.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:44 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:06 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
Trainwrecking? Lols. Fuck you, Copy 'n Paste Queen. You can't hang. And for anyone who cares (no one) recently got a raise to almost 70K/yr plus vested next January. 15 years in means guaranteed pension & benefits at retirement. OFN/the nursing union runs things where i work. Damn glad and blessed to be in OFN. Fuck you, dipshit dreamer Rock 'n Roll poser.

And now back to the mighty Burning Witch:

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Last edited by libertycaps on Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:27 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
And a massif FUCK YOU, tooth decayed MJS. Just how many years have you RIPPED OFF your lovely wife and kids?!? Just how many hours have you stolen from them with your internets bullshit??! Do they even know you? Do they even want to know you??! It's puke-in-the-mouth disgusting.

Your wife is an Angel. And obviously alot smarter than your sorry DEAD BEAT DAD ass.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:52 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
"Mental Health Care" is full of under-educated uninspired lazy hacks like yourself. You and your ilk are why it's universally considered the health care sewer.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:57 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
Got no Copy 'n Paste left in you? Fuck you. You are a spineless snowflake bottom.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:09 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia

Countess ov Bath.

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 Post subject: Re: Burning Witch
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:22 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:47 pm
Posts: 2335
Location: Concordia
Keep peepin' you weak lil bitch. I still got half a bottle of Rye and don't have to go to work until 3.
Look to your fap happy sewing circle for support. Belly aches? Cramping? Shit pushed up your bowel? Need a Midol?

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